Events / WoW

Week of Writing 2016 Schedule is Here

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Week of Writing 2016 is underway! Check back for frequent updates!


Monday, May 9th

 

Marathon Reading

12:00 pm – 2:00 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

And Beneath Such Quiet: The Elegy in the Modern World

2:00 pm – 2:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Marathon Reading

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Autumn House Press

5:00 pm – 6:30 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore


Tuesday, May 10th

Diverse Paths to a Technical Communications Career

11:00 am – 12:20 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Free Speech: Writers, Campuses, and Words in Conflict

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Be Heard: Exacting: A Talk & an Interactive Experience

2:00 pm – 3:20 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

This is Writers Room

3:30 pm – 5:00pm  |  Location: Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships, Lindy House Learning Terrace, 3509 Spring Garden


Wednesday, May 11th

Healing & Writing

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Writing Funny:  Blogging, Playwrighting, and Storytelling in Philadelphia

2:00 pm – 3:20 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Cultivating the Wasteland: The Art of Narrative “TV”

3:30 pm – 5:00 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore


Thursday, May 12th

Writing About Science

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Legible Pictures

3:30 pm – 5:00 pm  |  Location: The Writing Center


Friday, May 13th

The Subject of Sports

11:00 am – 11:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Slam, Bam, Thank You Ma’am!

12:00 pm – 12:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Maya Reading

1:00 pm – 1:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

English Department Awards

3:30 pm – 5:00 pm  |  Location: Bossone 3rd Fl. Atrium

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Monday, May 9th

Marathon Reading

12:00 pm – 2:00 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Student winners of the WoW Writing Contest, as well as faculty members, read from their own original creative writing. Each reading is followed by questions and comments from the audience as the writers talk about the inspiration and decisions that made the pieces possible. Join us for as much or as little of this session as you are able.

And Beneath Such Quiet: The Elegy in the Modern World

2:00 pm – 2:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

From the ancient Greeks to Thomas Gray to Larry Levis, the Elegy is a poetic form that mourns the dead. In modern times, elegies have been written in response to major world events, such as the Holocaust and to express general feelings of loss and metaphysical grief. But in this new era of genre busting, elegies appear in art forms other than poetry. The panelists—a poet, fiction writer, visual artist and composer— will each discuss their use of the elegiac in their individual practice.

Panel Participants:

Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach, Poety, University of Pennsylvania

Cheryl Sucher, Fiction Writer, author of The Rescue of Memory (Scribners)

Cheryl Levin, Artist

Bruce Kaminsky, Musician, Drexel University

Moderator: 

Harriet Millan, Drexel University, Certificate Program in Writing and Publishing

Autumn House Press

5:00 pm – 6:30 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Panel Participants:

Kathy Anderson is a fiction writer, playwright and winner of the 2015 Autumn House Press Fiction Prize. In January 2016, Autumn House Press published her short story collection, “Bull and Other Stories.” Her plays have also been performed and produced both internationally and domestically.

Harrison Fletcher is an author, former columnist and feature writer for newspapers. He has received many awards and prizes for his work, including the 2015 Autumn House Press Nonfiction Prize for Presentimiento: A Life In Dreams. Currently, he teaches in the MFA in writing programs at Virginia Commonwealth University and Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Anne Marie Macari is the author of various poems and essays which have appeared in her books, magazines and anthologies. In 2000, her book, Ivory Cradle, received the APR/Honickman First Book Prize. She has also founded the Drew MFA Program in Poetry & Poetry in Translation.

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Tuesday, May 10th

Diverse Paths to a Technical  Communication Career

11:00 am – 12:20 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

This session discusses some diverse industries where you can pursue a technical communications career.  We will discuss how clear concise writing adds value in the environmental and the e-learning industries. We will also discuss how clear concise writing enhances technical content targeted for a global audience.

Panel Participants:

Nad Rosenberg is president and founder (in 1985) of TechWRITE, Inc., a communications consulting company offering services that make complicated information easy to understand. TechWRITE specializes in technical writing, editing, e-learning development, web content development, and plain language consulting.

Myrian Siftar is the president of MTM LinguaSoft, a professional language services partner, which she founded in 2003 after a successful career as an information technology consultant. By enabling accurate and compelling global communication, MTM LinguaSoft’s clients receive the benefits of translated and localized website content, multilingual technical and marketing content in addition to foreign-language voice-overs for audio and video productions. After completing the equivalent of an M.S. in Computer Science at a leading French engineering school, Myriam went on to receive a Masters from the European School of Management in Paris (formerly, Ecole Superieure de Commerce de Paris) and an M.B.A. from Drexel University. Follow on LinkedIn or Twitter @mtmlinguasoft

Gary Sternberg is currently the Publications Coordinator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Inspector General. Gary has worked for the EPA OIG for 16 years and has been a writer-editor in the federal government for a total of 31 years. A graduate of Temple University, Gary started his career as a newspaper reporter and editor. As the EPA OIG Publications Coordinator, Gary is responsible for the editing and publication of EPA OIG reports. Gary has been a member of the Society for Technical Communications for 25 years, and has spoken at numerous STC events.

Moderator: 

Lawrence Souder earned his PhD in the rhetoric of science from Temple University after working for a number of years as a technical writer and editor for IBM and ADP. His research is focused on the ethics of communications among scientists and between scientists and the public. He is also the founding director of Drexel Edits, a center that offers pro-bono editing services to nonprofit organizations in the neighborhoods bordering Drexel University. He teaches graduate courses in communication ethics, technical and science writing and editing, and nonprofit communication for the master’s and undergraduate programs in the department.

Free Speech: Writers, Campuses, and Words in Conflict

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

The freedom to share written ideas regardless of content seems like a universal right, but it is sometimes limited. Do we feel we are able to question free speech, or is it a non-negotiable right that we cannot get around? Are the stakes for allowing free speech high enough to justify the ways speech can serve to marginalize and oppress? Can it sometimes be used as a way to block criticism or justify speech that only serves the speaker’s self-interest? How are writers positioning themselves amid all of these questions, and what challenges do writers face when looking at free speech in the 21st century?

Panel Participants:

Erin Entrada Kelly is the author of The Land of Forgotten Girls (HarperCollins) –named one of the Best Multicultural Books of 2016 by Booklist– and Blackbird Fly, which earned an Asian/Pacific american Honor Award for Literature and was included on several “Best Book” lists for 2015, including Kirkus, School Library Journal, and the Center for the Study of Multicultural Literature. Blackbird Fly is currently long-listed for the SIBA Pat Conroy Southern Book Prize. Her short fiction has been nominated for the Philippines Free Press Literary Award and the Pushcart Prize. She released a short story collection, Her Name was Fidela, in 2014.

Matthew Freeman

@mfreemanwriter Matthew Freeman is a playwright. His plays have been seen on stages throughout New York City by way of the Access Theater; 4th Street Theater; The Brick Theater, HERE Arts Center, The Metropolitan Playhouse, The New Ohio, 80WSE Gallery and at the Incubator Arts Project at St. Mark’s Church.  His plays include The Language, Bluebeard, When is a Clock, Traveling to Montpelier, The Listeners (Nominee: Best Performance Art Production – New York Innovative Theatre Awards 2015), Why We Left Brooklyn, That Which Isn’t, The Starving Dress, The Most Wonderful Love, The Death of King Arthur, That Old Soft Shoe, Confess Your Bubble and Brandywine Distillery Fire.  His plays and monologues have been published by Samuel French, Applause, Smith & Kraus, the New York Theatre Experience and Playscripts. His audio drama Lift Lift Lift was a part of the HearNow Festival and Atlanta Fringe Radio. As a director, Freeman has staged The Zebra Shirt of Lonely Children by Matthew Trumbull at the NY International Fringe Festival 2012 (Encore Series; Award, Overall Excellence in Solo Performance) and the Minnesota Fringe Festival 2013. He is a current resident playwright at New Dramatists and a MacDowell Colony Fellow. Freeman is a graduate of Emerson College. www.matthewfreemanwriter.com

Samantha Harris is FIRE’s director of speech code research, so while she may not be able to name your university’s sports team, she will definitely be able to tell you all about their harassment policy. She graduated from Princeton University in 1999 and then attended the University of Pennsylvania Law School. After a federal clerkship and a brief stint as a litigator, she landed at FIRE in 2005 and has been there ever since. Samantha lives outside of Philadelphia with her husband and their three daughters.

Be Heard: Exacting: An Interactive Experience

2:00 pm – 3:20 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

EXACTING: Learn this dynamic system of tools that will empower you to recognize, and utilize every linguistic opportunity in a piece of written text. This interactive session will introduce you to an exciting new technique that will not only teach you to read more exactly, but to speak more masterfully. This system will help you to build a strong foundation for your rigorous and daily reading and speaking practice. This is eye-training, and ear-training for readers and speakers, as well as anyone in a position to make meaning.

Panel Participants:
Bill Fennelly is an award winning theater director and Assistant Professor of Theater at Drexel. His work has been seen on Broadway, Off Broadway and in regional theater across the country. Projects include the original company of Jersey Boys, The Lion King, four seasons at New York City Opera at Lincoln Center and Cirque du Soleil.

This is Writers Room

3:30 pm – 6:00 pm  |  Location: Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships, Lindy House Learning Terrace, 3509 Spring Garden

Writers Room is flipping the script on the workshop. Week of Writing participants will get a workshop designed by attendees for attendees. You won’t want to miss this. You won’t want to miss what you’ll make. Reception following the workshop.

Event Facilitators:

Kirsten Kaschock

Rachel Wenrick


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Wednesday, May 11th

Healing and Writing

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

This panel will focus on the therapeutic aspects of writing.  A poet, a novelist/playwright, and a psychoanalyst/writer will discuss the unique approach to writing that each of them has.  Regardless of whether they have facilitated writing workshops with teens in recovery, cancer or ALS patients, patients in hospice care, or medical students, the outcome is the same – writing is a vehicle for delving deep into the “dark night of the soul;” writing can help us to discover the power of language for healing and redemption.

Panel Participants:

Dr. Ted Fallon is a practicing psychoanalyst and writer who teaches reflective and creative writing to medical students at Drexel University’s College of Medicine in their medical humanities program.  Dr. Fallon was trained at the Yale Child Study Center, Western New England Institute for Psychoanalysis and the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia. He believes that articulating a narrative of oneself and the world including those hidden parts of ourselves then allows us to more effectively navigate in the world.

Ken Bingham has written 12 novels, about twenty plays or so, and produced at least one hundred others through his affiliations with Theatre Exile in Philly, Waterfront South in NJ, REVV Theatre in NYC, and EDGE Productions, East Coast. He has taught at Drexel since 1989, where he currently teaches the Community-Based Learning class on Hospice Journaling.

Lisa DeVuono has facilitated creativity and poetry workshops with teens in recovery, cancer and ALS patients and for individuals living with mental health challenges.  She was the co-founder of It Ain’t Pretty, a women’s writing collective that performed in a variety of places including bookstores, cafes, radio and prison. For ten years she worked as coach and mentor-trainer in the Artist Conference Network, a nationwide coaching community for artists doing creative work.  She has written a guide called Poetry as a Tool for Recovery: An Easy-to-Use Guide in Eight Sessions; Institute for Poetic Medicine, c2014.

Moderator:

Jill Moses

Writing Funny:  Blogging, Playwrighting, and Storytelling in Philadelphia

2:00 pm – 3:20 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Funny Philly fashion/political blogger Katherine Fritz (I Am Begging My Mother Not To Read This Blog/Ladypockets), award-winning storyteller, sitcom enthusiast, and playwright R. Eric Thomas (Time is on Our Side), as well as actor, producer, playwright, rock star Jennifer Childs (I Will Not Go Gently), join together to think and talk about how to write funny.

Panel Participants:

Jen Childs is the Co-Founder and Producing Artistic Director of 1812 Productions, the country’s only professional regional theater dedicated solely to comedy.  For 1812 she has created over 20 original works of comedic theater including the annual political humor show THIS IS THE WEEK THAT IS.  Her play TO THE MOON, inspired by the life and work of Jackie Gleason, was a 2015 Barrymore Award nominee for Best New Play and her current solo comedy I WILL NOT GO GENTLY runs at Plays and Players Theater until May 15, 2016 (www.1812productions.org for tickets).  She is an alum of Comedysportz Philadelphia.

Katherine Fritz is a costume designer, a teaching artist, a writer and a worrywart. She’s the woman behind “Ladypockets,” where she writes a satirical fashion magazine that tells you where to get Sonia Sotomayor’s blazers, and “I Am Begging My Mother Not To Read This Blog,” where she writes about everything else. She’s been published in the Huffington Post, the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Sondheim Review, Upworthy, MTV Style, and American Theatre, among others, and has appeared on several NPR stations as a guest speaker. When she’s not hunched behind her keyboard, Katherine is a freelance costume designer for dozens of companies, including the Philadelphia Artists’ Collective, where she is the resident costume designer and marketing director. She’s an awesome summer camp teacher. She gives great hugs.

R. Eric Thomas, playwright and stand-up dramedian, has been called “one of the most talented storytellers in Philly” by the Philadelphia Weekly. He is the long-running host of “Songbird: The Search for Philly’s Best Singer” and The Moth in Philadelphia. He frequently lectures and leads workshops on intersectional comedy, storytelling and using narrative structure to transform business practices.  Eric has appeared on RISK!and The SoundtrackSeries multiple times; he gave a talk at the 2011 TEDxPhilly conference. Since 2014 he has also worked with TED to coach TEDx speakers. His writing has appeared in FusionPhiladelphia Magazine, NewsworksThinkingDance, among others.  His produced plays includeTime Is On Our Side,  Human Resources the wordless puppet play Frieda the Invisible Woman ,  and When You Put It Like That It Just Sounds Ridiculous.

Moderator:

Fred Siegel  is a writing teacher as well as Associate Director of the First-Year Writing Program.  He is also a magician, a memoirist, and an improviser in Comedysportz Philadelphia (short form) and Tongue & Groove (long form). He has appeared in about a dozen Philly Fringe Festivals and last year did a seven month run with his one-man show “Man of Mystery” (produced by CSz Philadelphia). He is proud to have one-eighth of a Barrymore Award for Best Ensemble, having appeared as a lecherous dancing hippie in Karen Getz’s Suburban Love Songs, (1812 Productions, 2008).

Cultivating the Wasteland: The Art of Narrative “TV”

3:30 pm – 4:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

In 1961, FCC chairman labeled television “a vast wasteland,” with programming offering nothing of “substance” for viewers. For years, the term “couch potato” has been a sort of shaming device for individuals to get off the couch and stop watching television. Now television rivals film mainstream film in terms of quality and “bingewatching” is becoming a preferred viewing choice for audiences. So what has changed? How have writers and showrunners helped redefine quality tv? Why does Netflix care if we’re still watching? The panelists will discuss the changes in industry, audience, and culture that have ushered in a new era of quality of television.

Panel Participants:

Paula Marantz Cohen is a Distinguished Professor of English and Dean of Drexel’s Pennoni Honors College. She is the author of five nonfiction books and five novels, and has written on a range of cultural subjects for the TLS, the Yale Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The American Scholar, the WSJ, and other publications. She watches a lot of television.

Ellen Gray is the television critic for the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News. She has been writing about TV, and the changing ways we watch it, since 1994.

Twitter: @elgray
To read more: philly.com/ellengray

Dr. Rosalind Sibielski is an Assistant Professor of Film Studies at Rhode Island College. She has published scholarship on film, television, and visual culture in Literature and Psychology, Rhizomes, , and Feminist Media Studies, and has contributed chapters to the essay collections Monster Culture in the 21st Century: A Reader and Cyberfeminism 2.0. She is currently working on a book on revisionist fairy tales in contemporary popular culture.

Moderator:

Melinda Lewis is the Visiting Faculty Fellow for The Symposium at Drexel University. She studies intersections of identity, ideology, and comedy in film and television. She is currently interested in the bridging affect studies with humor and examining the relationship between jokes and bodies, including physical responses that may or may not include laughter. Her work has been published in The Projector, Studies in American Humor, and M/C Journal.

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Thursday, May 12th

Writing About Science

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Science writing means writing about science, medicine, and technology for general readers, as well as peers. Science writing can appear in magazines, newspapers, books, on the walls of museums, on television or radio, and of course, online. It grapples with DNA, fractals, synapses, and quasars, but does so with grace, style, but with the intent of imparting information at its core. Its practitioners worry as much about how to tell the story of science as the science. Science writing is ambitious, creative, important and hard to do; it can also be great fun and when it comes off well, highly rewarding.”

Moderator: Dr. Ted Daeschler

Ted Daeschler has been at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University since 1987 and serves as Vice-President for Systematic Biology and the Library. His responsibilities at the Academy focus on research, collections building, and on public programs within the museum. He is also a professor in the Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science Department at Drexel University where he teaches undergraduate classes in paleontological and geological subject areas and mentors students in research activities. Dr. Daeschler’s research program in paleontology focuses on vertebrate fossils from the Late Devonian Period (385-363 million-years-ago) in North America. Fieldwork is ongoing since 1993 in Pennsylvania and since 1999 on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic. Fossil discoveries from this time interval help us to answer questions about the diversification of major groups of fishes, the origin of limbed vertebrates, and the invasion of land by plants and animals.

Panel Participants: 

Richard McCourt

Rick McCourt has been Botany curator at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel since 1997 and a faculty member of BEES since it was formed three years ago.  Dr. McCourt does research on the biodiversity, evolution, ecology, and systematics of green algae, specifically green algae that are among the closest living algal relatives of land plants.  He has been on faculty at DePaul University in Chicago and Drexel, teaching courses in evolutionary biology and ecology, and has mentored undergraduate and co-op students in his laboratory.  He worked at the National Science Foundation as a Program Director in the Divisions of Biological Science and Education and Human Resources.  He has also worked as a science reporter at National Public Radio, written for popular magazines such as Discover and Outside, and edited a book on science journalism with Ted Anton at DePaul.  In 1985 he won the AAAS Westinghouse Award for Science Journalism in Radio, for a series on Aquaculture broadcast on NPR.

Sean O’Donnell

Sean O’Donnell is a professor and Associate Department Head of the Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science at Drexel University. He received a PhD in Entomology and Zoology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a Postdoctoral Fellow in Animal Behavior and Entomology from the University of California, Davis. O’Donnell’s research interests include: ecological and social factors in brain development and evolution, thermal physiology and thermal ecology, nutritional ecology and division of labor, spatial ecology and population genetics, tropical biology, and Bird/army ant interactions. He has recently been involved in natural history film consulting and writing.

Steven Volk  is a contributing editor at Discover magazine and a writer at large for Philadelphia. His stories bring city reporting edge to science writing, looking for the places where money, ego and politics disrupt the self-correcting system of science.

 

Elizabeth Burke Watson  is an assistant professor in the Department of Biodiversity, Earth & Environmental Sciences, and the wetland section leader at the Patrick Center for Environmental Research at the Academy of Natural Sciences. She received her PhD in physical geography from the University of California, Berkeley, and prior to coming to Drexel University, worked as a research ecologist for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The focus of Elizabeth’s research is on the impacts of climate and land use change on coastal habitats, including seagrass meadows, coastal marshes, mangrove swamps, coral reefs and tidal lagoons.  Elizabeth has contributed to more than 30 peer-reviewed scientific publications over the last ten years, and has produced a similar number of publications for public audiences as newsletter articles for governmental organizations, wildlife refuges, and land trusts. As such, she acutely feels the tension between writing to inform and writing to encourage development of responsible environmental policies.

Legible Pictures: Using Writing with Drawing and Drawing with Writing (A Talk and an Interactive Experience)

3:30 pm – 4:50 pm  |  Location: The Writing Center

Are you a writer who draws? Are you an artist who writes? This event will appeal to you if you answer yes to one of these questions, or even if you are mainly interested as a spectator or reader of cross-disciplinary works.

In the first part of this session, audience-participants will learn about the writing/drawing practices of accomplished artists and writers. In the second part, the artists and writers will facilitate a writing and workshop activity. All audience-participants should leave this event with not only food for thought, but drafts of new writing and drawing.

Panel Participants:

Kelly McQuain‘s  first poetry collection was selected by C. Dale Young for the Bloom chapbook prize. Recently he’s been a Lambda Literary Fellow and a Sewanee Scholar. His poems have appeared in The Pinch, Redivider, Assaracus, and The Philadelphia Inquirer as well as such anthologies as Rabbit Ears: TV Poems and Drawn to Marvel: Poems from the Comic Books. His comix-based poetics essay is a top draw at Cleaver Magazine, and this spring he’s launching a series of visual poems that are poetry portraits at Fjords Review.

Jacklynn Niemiec is an architect and is a full time faculty in the Architecture program at Drexel University teaching design studios, drawing and visualization. Her creative interest lies in developing visual methods for understanding and representing space with the added and intangible layers of time, movement and memory. She has previously taught at Temple University in Philadelphia. She believes that the process of drawing is more important than the outcome-revealing more than one sought to draw in the first place.For more of her recent work, visit https://variablespace.wordpress.com

Melanie Farley is a multimedia poet, which really just means that she loves to collaborate across media to make poems. Her poetry collection, *things we have in writing (POEMS for Z)*, is due out through *dancing girl press* in 2016, and you can find her work in a few smaller publications including *NAIL V *and *One Ded Cow*. She has also curated several multimedia poetry events, including one for the *Bay Area Poetry Marathon *in San Francisco, and she has collaborated with a number of sound artists, including: to[r]entjet, Paul Feyertag, He Can Jog, and others. She has an MFA in Writing from California College of the Arts, and she is the founding editor of SOUND:POETREE::Fanzine [http://www.soundpoetree.com]. Also, she hugs you. Follow her on Twitter: @soundpoetree.

Moderator:

Valerie Fox’s books include The Rorschach Factory, The Glass Book, and Poems for the Writing: Prompts for Poets (co-written with Lynn Levin). Much involved in collaboration, Fox has published many poems and stories co-written with Arlene Ang, and also published Bundles of Letters Including A, V and Epsilon, which is a compilation with Ang. She’s taught at numerous institutions, including Peirce College (in Philadelphia) and Sofia University (in Tokyo). She currently teaches writing at Drexel. She enjoys the challenge and variety of experience of teaching creative writing: no group is ever the same. She’s a contributing editor at Texture Press [www.texturepress.org].

 

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Friday, May 13th

The Subject of Sports

11:00 am – 11:50 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

A newspaper sports writer, English professor who teaches “The Literature of Baseball,” and sports management professor who is an expert about social justice issues in sports will offer varying perspectives on how sports forms a writing subject, and they will also explore the effects of sports writing on our culture.

Panel Participants:

Ellen Staurowsky is a professor in the Center for Hospitality and Sport Management. She is an expert in the areas of social justice issues in sport, gender equity in sport, Title IX pay equity and equal employment opportunity, athlete exploitation, college sport reform, and misappropriation of American Indian imagery in sport.

Brad Wilson,  journalist since 1986. Worked full-time for Suburban & Wayne Times, Suburban Advertiser, Easton Express-Times, The Record, The (Doylestown) Intelligencer, and Easton again, all but 17 months (1995-1997) in sports. Multiple award winner in both PA and NJ state press association. Named Wrestling Journalist of the Year by National Wrestling Media Association (2015). President of Pen& Pencil Club. Other interests classical music, fine wine, reading, art, jazz, travel. Live in South Philadelphia with my cat, Chester.

Richard Astro is an English professor at Drexel University. Aside from three decades as a department chair, an arts and sciences dean and two stints as a university provost, he has written and/or edited books on John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway, and Bernard Malamud as well more than 30 articles on these and other 20th century American writers as well as on higher education administration. He  founded the National Consortium for Academics and Sports in 1984 and continues to serve as its Chief Academic Officer, and, since 2005, has served as an educational consult to the New York Mets Baseball Organization.

Moderator: 

Scott Warnock is an associate professor of English and Director of the Writing Center and Writing Across the Curriculum. He teaches first-year writing and courses such as Writing in Cyberspace, The Literature of Business, and The Peer Reader in Context. His research interests focus on uses of technology in writing instruction, particularly how learning technologies can help student writers and facilitate better methods for faculty to respond to student work. He is the author of Teaching Writing Online: How and Why and numerous book chapters and articles. He has spoken about teaching and technology issues and opportunities at many national conferences, and is Co-Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication Committee for Best Practices in Online Writing Instruction. He was co-founder of Subjective Metrics, Inc. a company created to develop Waypoint writing assessment and peer review software. He also maintains two blogs, one about online writing instruction at onlinewritingteacher.blogspot.com and “Virtual Children” at http://whenfallsthecoliseum.com/category/blood/virtual-children/.

Slam, Bam, Thank You Ma’am!

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Painted Bride Quarterly’s own interactive writing competition!

Come check out the game where the audience makes all the decisions!

Think of the silliness of “Whose Line is it Anyway?” and the drama of Henry Rollins, then think again…

The audience calls out writing prompts and then the audience writes in response. Volunteers share, the audience makes noise, and the winner gets to reach into our swag bag for a surprise.

We’re not sure we explained it well enough—you better just come see for yourself.

Maya Reading

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm  |  Location: Drexel Bookstore

Celebrate another year of promoting literacy and creativity with Maya, Drexel’s only student-run literary magazine.

English Department Awards

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm  |  Location: Bossone 3rd Fl. Atrium

This ceremony features the 33rd Annual Freshman Writing Awards, the Literature Essay Prize, the Week of Writing (WoW) Awards, and the Sigma Tau Delta Inductions. The awards are sponsored by the Erika Guenther and Gertrud Daemmrich Memorial Prizes, The Department of English & Philosophy, and the College of Arts & Sciences. Refreshments will be served.

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Katarina Kapetanakis
Katarina is a Junior English Major who likes pina coladas and getting caught in the rain. However, the only thing she'll be caught doing in the dunes of the cape is reading a good book.

One thought on “Week of Writing 2016 Schedule is Here

  1. What a week of writing! Discussions of free speech, drawing and writing, science writing, and exacting/reading reminded me why I love books, words, and punctuation.

    Thank you, Kathleen, Marshall, Eileen, Bill, Valerie, Erin, et.al.It was worth all your work.

    Wow! —- !

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